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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and they come just 24 hours after president obama weighed in, too, saying gay athletes should simply bring home the gold. here's abc's kirit radia. >> reporter: today, thousands turned out at demonstrations across europe. many calling for more protests when russia hosts the winter olympics next year in sochi. on friday, president obama added his voice. >> and if russia doesn't have gay and lesbian athletes, then it will probably make their team weaker. >> reporter: the law is so broadly defined, just speaking about homosexuality or wearing rainbow colors in public could lead to fines, deportation, even jail. some are now calling for a boycott of the sochi games. president obama rejected that idea. >> one of the things i am really looking forward to is maybe some gay and lesbian athletes bringing home the gold or silver or bronze. >> reporter: some openly gay athletes also oppose a boycott. >> when you practice and you train for 15, 20 years of your life, you essentially, this is your golden moment. >> reporter: in the u.s., a movement to boycott russian products, including vodka, is growing. bu
. >> reporter: just friday, president obama had this to say. >> no, i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. there were other avenues available for somebody whose conscience was stirred. >> reporter: mr. obama outlined new measures to reform the secret surveillance programs that snowden revealed, saying he would have done it anyway. >> i called for a thorough review of our surveillance operations before mr. snowden made these leaks. >> reporter: and this weekend, julian assange, the wikileaks founding, also took issue with the administration, saying, quote, reforms have been made and for that, edward snowden is owed a debt of gratitude. others say he's only earned his felony charges. david? >> susan saulny there at the white house. susan, thank you. >>> and tonight, after that al qaeda threat that shut down nearly two dozen u.s. embassies around the world, all but one have now reopened. in yemen, where the threat originated, the doors do remain locked tonight and abc's muhammad lila is in cairo tonight. muhammad? >> reporter: good evening, david. several of the embassies that were closed ha
destroyed. >> good morning, everybody. >> reporter: all of this as the obama administration struggles with how to respond. on "this week" with george stephanopoulos, growing bipartisan opposition to continuing u.s. aid. >> i think the actions of the last week, no doubt, are going to cause us to suspend aid. >> i would cut off aid. i would, however, engage in intense diplomacy in egypt and in the region. >> reporter: david, the death of more than 35 brotherhood members in police custody in disputed circumstances will only keep tensions here sky high. david? >> muhammad, thank you. >>> in syria this evening, a team of u.n. inspectors is now on the ground, on the hunt for proof of chemical weapons. the government has promised to cooperate. the inspectors will now visit three areas. both the government and the rebels accusing the other side of using chemical arms. >>> and from london this evening, where the headlines this sunday were all about princess diana and this new conspiracy theory about the crash that took her life. scotland yard now looking into it, as we learn here more about wh
repositioned, what is coming next? president obama in a rare white house meeting with his national security advisors today. this prompted the meeting. growing proof that chemical weapons might have been used to kill more than 1,000 in syria, among them so many children. tonight volunteers, doctors without borders, inside syria, treating patients. now revealing the symptoms they are treating. saying more than 3,000 patients were rushed in with what they call neurotoxin symptoms, similar to what you'd see in a chemical attack. more than 300 people they say died. >>> tonight here three urgent questions, is america about to get involved? what are the options? and if so, how soon? abc's cleave global affairs correspondent martha raddatz reports from the region on the cris this syria. marth ra. >> reporter: good evening, david. as we stand here tonight, u.s. warships are being repositioned very nearby in case of a military air strike on syria. tonight, evidence of a chemical attack in syria is mounting. new images showing the horror. the president spent the day huddled behind closed doors with hi
and children killed in the most horrific way. president obama says he will not intervene until the attack is verified, but administration officials are tonight saying there is a strong suspicion that the assad regime launched the attack, adding that the rebels do not even have the kind of rockets in which the chemicals were believed to be delivered. today, syria said it would allow u.n. inspectors to visit the site, but american officials say it's too little, too late, and the evidence they would present is likely corrupted. so, how soon could this happen? u.s. officials tell abc news, a response must be timely, done soon enough to prevent another chemical attack. "we are not talking about months." >> i think the best that we could hope for is to deter mr. assad from using chemicals against his people again. and worst case, drag us into a larger middle east conflict. >> reporter: david, the administration has also made very clear they do not want to take any kind of action alone. so, there have been urgent meetings with allies here in the region and elsewhere. david? >> martha raddatz wit
against extremism. despite the bloody crackdown, the obama administration still views egypt as too important of an ally to give up. egypt allows u.s. aircraft to fly over its territory usually without any restrictions -- crucial to the u.s. mission -- in afghanistan -- and it allows u.s. warships to skip to the front of the line during times of crisis at the crowded suez canal. david, the government has imposed a nighttime curfew here in egypt. already thousands of people are defying that curfew. another sign that things have quickly spiralled out of control. david? >> another tense evening, muhammad, thank you. >> and from london tonight, five years now after the definitive report on the crash that killed princess diana, suddenly word that scotland yard is taking yet another look. here's abc's nick schifrin from london. >> diana, the princess of wales has just died. >> buckingham palace has confirmed the death of diana princess of wales. >> reporter: we all remember where we were. august the 31st, 1997. diana and her boyfriend dodi al fayed at the ritz. talking with their driver.
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)